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Should You Eat Mushrooms on a Raw Food Diet?

No, not the magic kind! ;) I’m talking about edible, non-psychoactive mushrooms. You know, shitake, chanterelles, oyster, portabella, etc.

So what about ‘em? Should mushrooms be included on a healthy raw food diet?

Watch today’s Fit On Raw video to find out:

SHOULD YOU EAT MUSHROOMS ON A RAW FOOD DIET?

UPDATE

Raw reader Sue (see comments below) let me know that mushrooms contain hydrazines, which are carcinogenic.

While eating small amounts of mushrooms infrequently is unlikely to pose a problem, ideally, edible mushrooms probably shouldn’t be consumed raw.

What About You?

Love mushrooms? Hate ‘em? Got a tasty raw way to eat ‘em?

Let me know in the comments below! :)

Go raw and be fit,
Swayze

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23 comments

1 NvrTuLate { 03.27.12 at 9:47 pm }

[..YouTube..] Thanks for the great video on your use of mushrooms. I have learned over the years, the value of mushrooms. Who knew? In macrobiotics, I learned to use the dried shitake mushrooms in lots of dishes. Now I put 3 of them broken up in my smoothie. I also read a lot of good things about Reishi Mushroom and bought the Jing Herbs Ye Sheng Reishi Mushroom extract pdr w/cracked cell Spores. Calms the spirit, helps heart, liver, lungs, is an immune regulator. Mushrooms rock. Healthy stuff.

2 NvrTuLate { 03.27.12 at 9:47 pm }

Thanks for the great video on your use of mushrooms. I have learned over the years, the value of mushrooms. Who knew? In macrobiotics, I learned to use the dried shitake mushrooms in lots of dishes. Now I put 3 of them broken up in my smoothie. I also read a lot of good things about Reishi Mushroom and bought the Jing Herbs Ye Sheng Reishi Mushroom extract pdr w/cracked cell Spores. Calms the spirit, helps heart, liver, lungs, is an immune regulator. Mushrooms rock. Healthy stuff.

3 doutonight { 03.28.12 at 8:58 am }

[..YouTube..] Do you steam them or anything? Or just cut them straight into the salad? When I see mushrooms in stores they just seem dirty to me and I don’t feel I can clean them without a little heat. Of course then they aren’t completely raw anymore..

4 doutonight { 03.28.12 at 8:58 am }

Do you steam them or anything? Or just cut them straight into the salad? When I see mushrooms in stores they just seem dirty to me and I don’t feel I can clean them without a little heat. Of course then they aren’t completely raw anymore..

5 FitOnRaw { 03.28.12 at 9:48 am }

[..YouTube..] No, I use them raw.

6 FitOnRaw { 03.28.12 at 9:48 am }

No, I use them raw.

7 todayisthedaytolive { 03.29.12 at 9:26 pm }

[..YouTube..] Oh I thought you meant psychedelic mushrooms! Jk

8 todayisthedaytolive { 03.29.12 at 9:26 pm }

Oh I thought you meant psychedelic mushrooms! Jk

9 Lucas { 04.02.12 at 11:13 am }

I love the taste and texture of mushrooms, but I find them constipating if I eat them for prolonged periods of time.

10 Sue { 04.02.12 at 11:53 am }

I would think it would be best to avoid mushrooms…these statements are from Diet, Nutrition and Cancer published in 1982 by the National Research Council: Studies in animals indicate that a
few nonnutritive constituents of some foods, such as hydrazines in mushrooms, are also carcinogenic.
The compounds thus far shown to be carcinogenic in animals have been reported to occur in the average U.S. diet in small amounts; however, there is no evidence that any of these substances individually makes a major contribution to the total risk of cancer in the United States. This lack of sufficient data should not be
interpreted as an indication that these or other compounds subsequently found to be carcinogenic do not present
a hazard.

Swayze Reply:

Thank you, Sue! I’ll will update the post.

11 Vicky { 04.02.12 at 12:14 pm }

Hello, to add to the discussion, I learned from Arthur Haines, botanist and expert on traditional and aboriginal diets, that mushrooms should not be eaten raw. I got a fantastic and unusual rash from an undercooked mushroom, so I would like to suggest that folks not used to mushrooms might want to use caution. I use some mushrooms medicinally (Chaga, reishi among others, either tinctured in alcohol or decocted –cooked like soup until the water cooks down to about half what you started with) — I’m not against using them, but I avoid raw mushrooms for the most part. Just sharing a different point of view.

12 Karen { 04.02.12 at 5:14 pm }

I enjoy them and glad they are ok. In fact after my juice feast is over I plan to make a stuffed portabella dish or two.

13 Sarah { 04.02.12 at 6:17 pm }

Boring, dragging, waste of time,promotional excuse, video.

14 Leonie { 04.03.12 at 3:33 am }

I have a herb that is green-leaved, called a ‘mushroom plant’ because its leaves taste of mild mushrooms. Yummo!

Here’s a quote:
Mushroom Plant (Rungia klossii)
DESCRIPTION: A low-growing bushy perennial to 60cm, this plant has thick, shiny, succulent leaves that have a delicate mushroom flavour. Blue flowers are borne in spring.

ORIGIN: New Guinea

CULTIVATION: Mushroom plant is suited to tropical and sub-tropical locations. It does best in rich soils enhanced with organic material. Choose a semi-shaded position, preferably with morning sun. The plant will grow from cuttings or from root division. (It spreads by suckering and will form a large clump over time. It needs ample water but good drainage.) In cooler areas it becomes dormant in winter.

USES: Mushroom Plant leaves can be used in salads and sandwiches. The mushroom flavour is enhanced by quick cooking so they make an excellent final addition to stir fries. The leaves are very nutritious and are rich in vitamins, iron and calcium.

That’s from http://www.global-garden.com.au/gardenherbs3.htm#Mushroom Plant

I avoid mushrooms now, given the mounting evidence that there’s something wrong in eating raw fungi, which I used to love.

BTW, I disagree with you entirely, Sarah. Whilst I would rather Swayze would just get straight into it, how she presents is entirely up to her.

I am very grateful to Swayze for the time and trouble she takes.

Dominus tecum
Leonie

Swayze Reply:

Wow, that sounds amazing!

15 Julie { 04.03.12 at 7:29 am }

How about garlic and onions on a raw food diet? Thank you, Swayze!

Swayze Reply:

I’ll post a video on this soon. Stay tuned!

16 helenka { 04.05.12 at 2:00 am }

well as a siberian native – i grew up close to the woods and mushrooms we consume a lot mostly fermented in glass for the winter just like everything else btw. our winter is long and very cold so if you don’t have stuff pickled and fermented you look old for about seven eight months of the year. Mushrooms have more nutrients than our nutri- value charts reveal, like the B-vits, vitamin D and many essential minerals as well as Polysaccharides – Complex carbohydrates that stimulate the immune system or Triterpenes – Steroid-like molecules that inhibit histamine release and have anti-inflammatory properties. I still prefer letting them ferment or having them fresh, so for the raw part – yes of course, but beware, some of them you can only eat once in your life l.o.l

17 viktorass23 { 07.02.12 at 6:23 pm }

[..YouTube..] Mushrooms actually has more attributes of an animal than a plant, it consumes oxygen and emits co2( just like we do), also mushrooms makes pee, just like we do. But they have no nerves, so eating them is ok, btw, they have vitamin B12!!!!! from a soil, made by bacteria.

18 viktorass23 { 07.02.12 at 6:23 pm }

Mushrooms actually has more attributes of an animal than a plant, it consumes oxygen and emits co2( just like we do), also mushrooms makes pee, just like we do. But they have no nerves, so eating them is ok, btw, they have vitamin B12!!!!! from a soil, made by bacteria.

19 ShesThe1yup { 11.18.12 at 6:05 pm }

Thank you for this :)

20 ShesThe1yup { 11.18.12 at 6:06 pm }

oh they do have vitamin B12 in them (i think its B12) which helps with iron levels I believe something I am often lacking in